Singapore Char Kway Teow in Jakarta: Singapore Restaurant

One of the things I miss most about being away from home is the HAWKER FOOD – hokkien mee, char kway teow, orh luak, bak chor mee, char siew + roast pork rice, the list goes on and on. And so nothing excites me more than when I manage to find a good replica of Singapore hawker food here in Jakarta (!!!).

A few months back, my driver took one of the small roads to Grand Indonesia shopping town. On the way there, I happened to catch sight of a big signboard with the words “Singapore Restaurant”. There were quite a number of cars parked outside the restaurant (= food should be good right?!). I immediately texted Agent D to tell him about it and made a mental note to check out the place sometime soon.

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Singapore Restaurant in Menteng.

Sometime soon came in the form of last Sunday (not very ‘soon’ heh). The restaurant interior reminded me of a typical zhi char restaurant in Singapore with round tables scattered all around. It also seemed to be a family type of place – most tables were made up of grandmas, grandpas, dads, mums, children, and helpers. Agent D and I were one of only two couples dining there at that time.

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Loving the Singapore label all over.

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Menu page containing Singapore specials (some are not exactly Singapore dishes though).

As char kway teow was their signature dish, Agent D and I got for ourselves one plate each. We also ordered a kailan with garlic in the hopes that it would even out the sinfulness (fats and oil) of our char kway teow. 🙂

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Char kway teow (kwetiau goreng).

I didn’t have high expectations for the char kway teow but it turned out to be pretty authentic. LOVED the generous portions of si hum (cockles) thrown inside. If only there were lup cheong and pork lard too, life would be complete. 🙂 🙂 🙂

In case you don’t know what char kway teow is…the dish is considered a national favourite of Singapore. It is made from flat rice noodles of approximately 1 cm in width, stir-fried over very high heat with light and dark soy sauce, chili, prawns, deshelled cockles, bean sprouts and chopped Chinese chives. The dish is commonly stir-fried with egg, slices of chinese sausage (lup cheong) and fishcake. Char kway teow is traditionally stir-fried in pork fat, with crisp croutons of pork lard (!!). One word – SHIOK.

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Kailan with garlic overdose.

I didn’t quite take to the kailan for the mere fact that there was simply too much fried garlic served on top of it. The taste of garlic was overpowering. I think only Popeye would have appreciated it.

Thankfully, the Chinese tea we ordered helped to flush down the fats and oil (or so we think, since the vegetables were of little help).

I would definitely return to Singapore Restaurant in Menteng to satisfy my char kway teow cravings again! ❤

Singapore Restaurant
Jl. Purworejo No. 28
Menteng, Jakarta

 


Char kway teow aside, SELAMAT IDUL FITRI to all my Indonesian and Muslim friends!!! ❤ ❤ ❤

Ray is visiting Jakarta this week and I was very happy to catch up with him and Christine today. I got to know Ray from Bahasa Indonesian language class during Atma Jaya days. The last I saw him was in January this year, when he returned to Taiwan for good.
 .
We used to practise our Bahasa Indonesian together but we’ve both gotten really rusty since classes ended. Dang. HARUS BERLATIH. So today we conversed mainly in English and lousy Mandarin on my end.

Good seeing you today Ray! Please come again to Jakarta soon!!!

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Volunteering in Jakarta Update: Kampung Kids

Can’t believe close to 9 months have gone by since I started volunteering at Kampung kids! I documented my initial thoughts on volunteering in Jakarta here: Volunteering in Jakarta: Kampung Kids | thediplowifey.

Looking back, I’ve learnt so much from the kids. They don’t have much yet are one of the most carefree around. While I teach them how to read and write in English, they’ve taught me so much more beyond the four walls of the classroom. 🙂

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Playing with paints in the classroom.

Of late, apart from teaching the children letters of the English alphabet and key vocabulary words + working on their penmanship, we have started doing art with them (thanks to Dianne who volunteers with me and is a real art genius!).

One art lesson we exposed them to watercolours. Dianne came out with the idea of painting the underside of their hands and putting together all their hand prints to produce a piece of artwork – a signboard for their classroom.

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Cute lil’ palm!

Having never touched paints before (despite them being 5-7 years of age), the children were very precarious about having their palms painted. When we asked for a volunteer, hardly anyone raised their hands.

We started with the daring ones, and slowly the more timid ones also came up to have their palms painted.

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Children with their drawing blocks and signature hand prints (for them to take home).

Here’s a picture of the beautiful art piece, a product of joint effort by all the kids. It’s now hung up in the front of their classroom. 🙂 🙂 🙂

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Lovely piece of artwork comprising the children’s hand prints.

Another art lesson, we pre-cut eye masks for the children and had them design their very own masks. (Many of the kids were into superheroes like Batman and Spiderman who wore masks.)

Here are some pictures of the kids in action:

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Luky designing his Batman mask (he’s wearing Batman on his shirt!)

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Hard at work.

One thing I’ve noticed about the kampung children is their willingness to share the little they have (be it crayons, pencils, erasers, etc). Even if they had only 2 pencils in their pencil case, they would happily loan the other to their friend without a pencil. These sweet gestures often brought a smile to my heart.

Here’s one of all our mini superheroes (in their own rights) posing for a picture. Aren’t they just so adorable? ❤ ❤ ❤

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Kampung kids superheroes.

My volunteering at Kampung kids (and my ladies bible study group) is on a hold for the next few weeks because of the mid-year school holidays. Crossing my fingers the children won’t forget all the letters and words we’ve taught them thus far!

Because next week is the Lebaran period in Jakarta, practically everyone I know (friends, Agent D’s colleagues, my driver, my helper, etc etc) is out of Jakarta. I heard it is going to be super duper quiet next week with GOOD TRAFFIC WITHOUT JAMS. Whoooop can’t wait!

[Wikipedia: Lebaran is the popular name for Eid al-Fitr in Indonesia and is one of the major national holidays in the country. Lebaran holiday officially lasts for two days in the Indonesian calendar, but the government usually declares a few days before and after the Lebaran as a bank holiday. Hence many Indonesians take this time to travel out of the country or return to their hometowns.)

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Selamat Lebaran with this Ramadan-themed Starbucks cup!!

Am so looking forward to the slow(er) week ahead.

xxx